HSH Adoption Info & Tips

HSH Dog/Puppy Adoption fees include:

  • Spay/neuter surgery, first distemper shot(s),
  • Bordatella ("Kennel Cough") Vaccine,
  • First Distemper/Parvo/Lepto Vaccine (2nd and 3rd if at shelter long enough)
  • Monthly dose of Revolution (fleas, ticks, heartworm, ear mites),
  • Liquid de-wormer,
  • Heartworm Test (for dogs 6 months or older),
  • Microchip with registration,
  • Rabies vaccine (if at least 3 months old)

Medium - Large - XL dogs

(6 months and up)

$100.00

Small Breed dogs

(6 months and older)

$275.00

ALL puppies

(5 months and under)

$400.00

HSH Cat/Kitten Adoption fees include:

  • First Distemper/Parvo/Lepto Vaccine (2nd and 3rd if at shelter long enough)
  • Monthly dose of Revolution (fleas, ticks, heartworm, ear mites),
  • Liquid de-wormer,
  • Microchip with registration,
  • Spay/neuter surgery, first distemper shot(s),
  • Rabies vaccine (if at least 3 months old)

Cats (6 months and older)

$90.00 each

2 cats for $130

Kittens (5 months and under)

$125.00 each

2 kittens for $200

Why Adopt a Shelter Dog? by blogger Zach David

Adopting a shelter dog is easily the best way that you can go about acquiring a new best friend. However, there are quite a few misconceptions about shelter dogs that may turn people away from giving these loving pups a second chance at life. So, this post will cover 21 facts about shelter dogs that will hopefully help you answer the question of: WHY ADOPT A SHELTER DOG?

Why was I denied adoption?

The Second Time Around

Adopting a pet from a rescue is startlingly similar to adopting a human baby from an adoption agency.

In both cases, the groups require a thorough screening process to ensure that the pet/baby is placed in a home where they will not only be cherished for the rest of their life but also receive the appropriate care and nurturing they need to thrive.

If you’ve never worked with a pet rescue, you might be annoyed by some of the hurdles you’ll have to jump over en route to adopting a pet.

But there’s one simple reason for all those hurdles: Rescues want to make sure their babies — many of whom they’ve saved from illness, abuse and death — are placed in permanent, loving homes where they will be spoiled and pampered for the rest of their lives.

Although there’s no way to determine for certain whether a potential adopter can provide the perfect home, rescues try hard — which means they do a lot of work in screening their applicants.

Here’s what you can expect from most rescues (policies and procedures will vary).